Visualizing Active Session History (ASH) to produce Grid Control charts

 

Preamble

When deeply looking at my 11.1 Grid Control for a database that suffer performance issue I played a bit in option (removing CPU Cores, Baselines and displaying Foreground + Background) I got the well know below display:

ash1
ash1

And noticed for first time that y axis unit is average active session and not a wait time in centiseconds or whatever which I would have personally done… but how do they do that ?

This database is an Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.1.0 – 64bit Production running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 5.5 (Tikanga) and I asked myself how would I do to generate it by myself (obviously knowing that all figures are inside Oracle database).

Without CPU Wait

I started to work with V$WAITCLASSMETRIC_HISTORY table that I joined with V$EVENT_NAME to display wait class and remove idle events:

SELECT
  a.begin_time,
  b.wait_class,
  SUM(a.time_waited)
FROM
  V$WAITCLASSMETRIC_HISTORY a,
  V$EVENT_NAME b
WHERE
  a.wait_class_id = b.wait_class_id
AND b.wait_class <>'Idle'
GROUP BY
  a.begin_time,
  b.wait_class
ORDER BY a.begin_time;

I even, for the first time, used a DataWareHouse way of presenting figures using 11g PIVOT keyword:

ALTER SESSION SET nls_date_format='dd-mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss';
SELECT * FROM
  (SELECT
      a.begin_time,
      b.wait_class,
      a.time_waited
    FROM
      V$WAITCLASSMETRIC_HISTORY a,
      V$EVENT_NAME b
    WHERE
      a.wait_class_id = b.wait_class_id
    AND b.wait_class <>'Idle') S
PIVOT (SUM(time_waited) FOR wait_class IN ('Administrative','Application',
'Cluster','Commit','Concurrency','Configuration','Network','Other','Queueing',
'Scheduler','System I/O','User I/O'))
ORDER BY begin_time;

Remark:
Unless working in XML the list of categories cannot be a subquery…

The list of categories is given with:

SQL> SET pages 20
SQL> SELECT DISTINCT wait_class FROM V$EVENT_NAME;
 
WAIT_CLASS
----------------------------------------------------------------
Administrative
Application
CLUSTER
COMMIT
Concurrency
Configuration
Idle
Network
Other
Queueing
Scheduler
SYSTEM I/O
USER I/O
 
13 ROWS selected.

But then I realized that versus Grid Control charts I’m missing the CPU information and with y axis unit name the source of their chart information is most probably V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY. This table contains a sample of active database sessions every second. I started with a query like this (last hour interval same as Grid Gontrol):

ALTER SESSION SET nls_date_format='dd-mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss';
SELECT
  sample_time,
  cpu            AS cpu,
  bcpu           AS bcpu,
  scheduler      AS scheduler,
  uio            AS uio,
  sio            AS sio,
  concurrency    AS concurrency,
  application    AS application,
  COMMIT         AS COMMIT,
  configuration  AS configuration,
  administrative AS administrative,
  network        AS network,
  queueing       AS queueing,
  clust          AS clust, --cluster is a keywords
  other          AS other
FROM (SELECT
        sample_time,
        DECODE(session_state,'ON CPU',DECODE(session_type,'BACKGROUND','BCPU','ON CPU'), wait_class) AS wait_class
      FROM v$active_session_history
      WHERE sample_time>sysdate- INTERVAL '1' HOUR) ash
PIVOT (COUNT(*) FOR wait_class IN ('ON CPU' AS cpu,'BCPU' AS bcpu,'Scheduler' AS scheduler,'User I/O' AS uio,'System I/O' AS sio,
'Concurrency' AS concurrency,'Application' AS application,'Commit' AS COMMIT,'Configuration' AS configuration,
'Administrative' AS administrative,'Network' AS network,'Queueing' AS queueing,'Cluster' AS clust,'Other' AS other));

Remark:
Here we even have more precise information for CPU than Grid Control with foreground and background CPU breakdown.

But when drawing curve with Excel I realized that points frequency is too high and did not produce a good graphic. If you closely look to Grid Control graphics you’ll realize that they have a point every minutes (which also reduce information to transfer from your Oracle database). After comparison I even think Oracle is doing an average, not when seconds are at 0 but at 30. I mean between, for example, 14:56:30 and 14:57:30. But to remain simple I have decided to do an average on rounded minutes:

ALTER SESSION SET nls_date_format='dd-mon-yyyy hh24:mi:ss';
SELECT sample_time,
  cpu/60            AS cpu,
  bcpu/60           AS bcpu,
  scheduler/60      AS scheduler,
  uio/60            AS uio,
  sio/60            AS sio,
  concurrency/60    AS concurrency,
  application/60    AS application,
  COMMIT/60         AS COMMIT,
  configuration/60  AS configuration,
  administrative/60 AS administrative,
  network/60        AS network,
  queueing/60       AS queueing,
  clust/60          AS clust,
  other/60          AS other
FROM (SELECT
        TRUNC(sample_time,'MI') AS sample_time,
        DECODE(session_state,'ON CPU',DECODE(session_type,'BACKGROUND','BCPU','ON CPU'), wait_class) AS wait_class
      FROM v$active_session_history
      WHERE sample_time>sysdate- INTERVAL '1' HOUR
      AND sample_time<=TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MI')) ash
PIVOT (COUNT(*) FOR wait_class IN ('ON CPU' AS cpu,'BCPU' AS bcpu,'Scheduler' AS scheduler,'User I/O' AS uio,'System I/O' AS sio,
'Concurrency' AS concurrency,'Application' AS application,'Commit' AS COMMIT,'Configuration' AS configuration,
'Administrative' AS administrative,'Network' AS network,'Queueing' AS queueing,'Cluster' AS clust,'Other' AS other));

Which produce, under Excel, a pretty good result:

ash2
ash2

With CPU wait

But if you look closer I’m missing a Grid Control information which is CPU Wait, even if I have CPU breakdown. By the way have you ever realized that CPU Wait information is even not available on a 10g database (at least with a 10g agent, I have not yet tried to upgrade the agent) ?

Finding this information is not piece of cake and I have to thanks Kyle Hailey for his fantastic post on this subject (see references). I used to select ‘CPU used by this session’ from V$SYSSTAT but this table contains figures since instance started, not very useful to have sampled precise information. New available tables are called V$SYSMETRIC and V$SYSMETRIC_HISTORY. V$SYSMETRIC_HISTORY has more history and contains information sampled at different interval (GROUP_ID column, when equal to 3 a sample very 15 seconds with 3 minutes history, when equal to 2 a sample every minute with 1 hour history):

SQL> col metric_name FOR a30
SQL> col METRIC_UNIT FOR a30
SQL> SELECT begin_time,metric_name,VALUE,metric_unit
     FROM v$sysmetric_history
     WHERE GROUP_ID=2
     AND metric_name LIKE '%CPU%'
     ORDER BY begin_time DESC;
 
BEGIN_TIME           METRIC_NAME                         VALUE METRIC_UNIT
-------------------- ------------------------------ ---------- ------------------------------
10-feb-2012 16:37:36 Host CPU Utilization (%)       4.40747015 % Busy/(Idle+Busy)
10-feb-2012 16:37:36 CPU Usage Per Sec              99.1352311 CentiSeconds Per SECOND
10-feb-2012 16:37:36 Host CPU Usage Per Sec         141.037579 CentiSeconds Per SECOND
10-feb-2012 16:37:36 DATABASE CPU TIME Ratio        21.9606878 % Cpu/DB_Time
10-feb-2012 16:37:36 Background CPU Usage Per Sec   2.60685068 CentiSeconds Per SECOND
10-feb-2012 16:37:36 CPU Usage Per Txn               1.8055702 CentiSeconds Per Txn
10-feb-2012 16:36:36 Host CPU Utilization (%)       3.96871183 % Busy/(Idle+Busy)
10-feb-2012 16:36:36 CPU Usage Per Sec              89.8532663 CentiSeconds Per SECOND
10-feb-2012 16:36:36 Host CPU Usage Per Sec         126.991518 CentiSeconds Per SECOND
10-feb-2012 16:36:36 DATABASE CPU TIME Ratio        20.2278502 % Cpu/DB_Time
10-feb-2012 16:36:36 Background CPU Usage Per Sec   1.15897888 CentiSeconds Per SECOND
.
.

Many interesting figures (‘Host CPU Utilization (%)’ * CPU_COUNT = ‘Host CPU Usage Per Sec’ (cs)) but the one we are looking for is ‘CPU Usage Per Sec’:

SQL> SELECT
       TRUNC(begin_time,'MI') AS sample_time,
       VALUE/100 AS cpu_ora_consumed
     FROM v$sysmetric_history
     WHERE GROUP_ID=2
     AND metric_name='CPU Usage Per Sec';
 
SAMPLE_TIME          CPU_ORA_CONSUMED
-------------------- ----------------
10-feb-2012 17:13:00       .579044014
10-feb-2012 17:12:00       .666609644
10-feb-2012 17:11:00       .608919704
10-feb-2012 17:10:00       .366372564
10-feb-2012 17:09:00       .527227849
10-feb-2012 17:08:00       .615885467
10-feb-2012 17:07:00       .468784569
10-feb-2012 17:06:00       .509915597
10-feb-2012 17:05:00       .594721699
10-feb-2012 17:04:00       .694008114
10-feb-2012 17:03:00       .564496874
.
.

Finally the tricky part is formula for CPU Wait which is difference between CPU demand from sessions (coming from V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY) and CPU really used by Oracle coming from V$SYSMETRIC_HISTORY. If we settle everything it gives:

SELECT sysmetric_history.sample_time,
  cpu/60 AS cpu,
  bcpu/60 AS bcpu,
  DECODE(SIGN((cpu+bcpu)/60-cpu_ora_consumed), -1, 0, ((cpu+bcpu)/60-cpu_ora_consumed)) AS cpu_ora_wait,
  scheduler/60 AS scheduler,
  uio/60 AS uio,
  sio/60 AS sio,
  concurrency/60 AS concurrency,
  application/60 AS application,
  COMMIT/60 AS COMMIT,
  configuration/60 AS configuration,
  administrative/60 AS administrative,
  network/60 AS network,
  queueing/60 AS queueing,
  clust/60 AS clust,
  other/60 AS other
FROM
  (SELECT
     TRUNC(sample_time,'MI') AS sample_time,
     DECODE(session_state,'ON CPU',DECODE(session_type,'BACKGROUND','BCPU','ON CPU'), wait_class) AS wait_class
   FROM v$active_session_history
   WHERE sample_time>sysdate-INTERVAL '1' HOUR
   AND sample_time<=TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MI')) ash
   PIVOT (COUNT(*) FOR wait_class IN ('ON CPU' AS cpu,'BCPU' AS bcpu,'Scheduler' AS scheduler,'User I/O' AS uio,'System I/O' AS sio,
   'Concurrency' AS concurrency,'Application' AS application,'Commit' AS COMMIT,'Configuration' AS configuration,
   'Administrative' AS administrative,'Network' AS network,'Queueing' AS queueing,'Cluster' AS clust,'Other' AS other)) ash,
   (SELECT
      TRUNC(begin_time,'MI') AS sample_time,
      VALUE/100 AS cpu_ora_consumed
    FROM v$sysmetric_history
    WHERE GROUP_ID=2
    AND metric_name='CPU Usage Per Sec') sysmetric_history
WHERE ash.sample_time (+)=sysmetric_history.sample_time
ORDER BY sample_time;

Remark:
I use an outer join on V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY simply because on a not very busy database (so no active sessions) you may have gaps in timestamps. This is obviously not happening in V$SYSMETRIC_HISTORY table.

With Oracle pre 11g

As written above PIVOT keyword is not available in 10g so the query is a bit less groovy:

SELECT
  sysmetric_history.sample_time,
  cpu,
  bcpu,
  DECODE(SIGN((cpu+bcpu)-cpu_ora_consumed), -1, 0, ((cpu+bcpu)-cpu_ora_consumed)) AS cpu_ora_wait,
  scheduler,
  uio,
  sio,
  concurrency,
  application,
  COMMIT,
  configuration,
  administrative,
  network,
  queueing,
  clust,
  other
FROM
  (SELECT
     TRUNC(sample_time,'MI') AS sample_time,
     SUM(DECODE(session_state,'ON CPU',DECODE(session_type,'BACKGROUND',0,1),0))/60 AS cpu,
     SUM(DECODE(session_state,'ON CPU',DECODE(session_type,'BACKGROUND',1,0),0))/60 AS bcpu,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Scheduler',1,0))/60 AS scheduler,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'User I/O',1,0))/60 AS uio,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'System I/O',1,0))/60 AS sio,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Concurrency',1,0))/60 AS concurrency,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Application',1,0))/60 AS application,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Commit',1,0))/60 AS COMMIT,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Configuration',1,0))/60 AS configuration,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Administrative',1,0))/60 AS administrative,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Network',1,0))/60 AS network,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Queueing',1,0))/60 AS queueing,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Cluster',1,0))/60 AS clust,
     SUM(DECODE(wait_class,'Other',1,0))/60 AS other
   FROM v$active_session_history
   WHERE sample_time>sysdate- INTERVAL '1' HOUR
   AND sample_time<=TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MI')
   GROUP BY TRUNC(sample_time,'MI')) ash,
  (SELECT
     TRUNC(begin_time,'MI') AS sample_time,
     VALUE/100 AS cpu_ora_consumed
   FROM v$sysmetric_history
   WHERE GROUP_ID=2
   AND metric_name='CPU Usage Per Sec') sysmetric_history
WHERE ash.sample_time (+)=sysmetric_history.sample_time
ORDER BY sample_time;

Below a Grid Control example chart of a 10.2.0.4 database with a 10.2.0.5 Oracle Grid Control agent:

ash3
ash3

Then with the above query and using Excel I’m able to get more precise information (breakdown of CPU per foreground and background + CPU Wait) like:

ash4
ash4

Conclusion

Even if all is available in Grid Control it is anyway interesting to find figures by yourself as it clarify myths of how getting them and helps you better understand charts you everyday use.

You can even, same as Grid Control, go deeper in V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY and filter on EVENT columns to get all Grid Control breakdown charts.

All other remaining charts (I/O, load average,..) will be seen… later on….

References

  • Oracle CPU time
  • Performance Tuning Using Advisors and Manageability Features: AWR, ASH, ADDM and Sql Tuning Advisor [ID 276103.1]

31 thoughts on “Visualizing Active Session History (ASH) to produce Grid Control charts

  1. Caesar Dutta says:

    Dear Sir:

    I want to capture %age of memory and cpu used by an Oracle database instance (PMON, SMON, DBWR, ARCHR,
    LGWR, Sql processes, waits, jobs etc etc). I want to capture this snapshot every hour.

    Please guide me with SQLs.

    Thanks in advance

    caesar

    • Hello Caesar,

      CPU used by instance is described in this post. Then for instance memory usage I would use V$PROCESS_MEMORY. Then with 2 SQL statements spooling in a file and a OS scheduler (cron, ..) you should be able to obtain what you target.

      Thanks, Yannick.

  2. Caesar Dutta says:

    Dear Yannick:

    First a wonderful post and thanks so much for your kind attention.

    Just one clarification.

    From your SQL above
    – please clarify that “%CPU used by an instance is SUM TOTAL OF ‘CPU’ and ‘BCPU’. I should not consider the
    waiting processes – as they are not yet utilizing the CPU”.

    Warm regards,

    Caesar

  3. Caesar Dutta says:

    Dear Yannick:

    Sorry I forgot to mention in my earlier post “April 23, 2012 at 07:59 “. The V$PROCESS_MEMORY is a
    breakdown of PGA. The integrated PGA allocated can be obtained from V$PROCESS. But what about SGA. It is also
    consumimg memory is it not??

    My point is that – suppose my system has 16GB of physical RAM. Then what %age is used by PGA+SGA? though I am missing UGA.

    Now an interesting fact. The system may have 16GBRAM. Then there is the virtual memory also “Page file” which
    may further complicate matter.

    Thanks in advance — Caesar

    • Hi Caesar,

      First let me tell you that I prefer OS tool to measure what processes are really using (memory, cpu,…).

      I don’t know what you really want to measure but what you are looking for is set by either SGA_MAX_TARGET or MEMORY_MAX_TARGET.

      Finally UGA can be get from V$SESSTAT but it is either part of PGA or SGA (dedicated/shared server mode). Hope it helps…

      Thanks, Yannick.

  4. Caesar Dutta says:

    Thanks very much. I agree that it is better to look at OS level using TOP command etc. I will write the SQL for
    Memory / CPU utilisation and post it here.

  5. Caesar Dutta says:

    Dear Yannick:

    When I execute the SQL

    SELECT
    TO_CHAR(TRUNC(sample_time,’MI’),’DD-MON-YYYY HH24:MI:SS’) AS sample_time,
    SUM(DECODE(session_state,’ON CPU’,DECODE(session_type,’BACKGROUND’,0,1),0))/60 AS cpu,
    SUM(DECODE(session_state,’ON CPU’,DECODE(session_type,’BACKGROUND’,1,0),0))/60 AS bcpu
    FROM v$active_session_history
    WHERE sample_time>sysdate- INTERVAL ‘1’ HOUR
    AND sample_time<=TRUNC(SYSDATE,'MI')
    GROUP BY TO_CHAR(TRUNC(sample_time,'MI'),'DD-MON-YYYY HH24:MI:SS')
    order by 1 asc
    "
    I am getting the output :
    SAMPLE_TIME CPU BCPU
    ——————– ———- ———-
    24-APR-2012 15:12:00 .933333333 0
    24-APR-2012 15:13:00 .966666667 0
    24-APR-2012 15:14:00 .966666667 0
    24-APR-2012 15:15:00 .933333333 0

    Now when I use the SQL
    "
    SELECT
    TO_CHAR(TRUNC(begin_time,'MI'),'DD-MON-YYYY HH24:MI:SS') AS sample_time,
    VALUE/100 AS cpu_ora_consumed
    FROM v$sysmetric_history
    WHERE GROUP_ID=2
    AND metric_name='CPU Usage Per Sec'
    order by 1 asc
    "
    I am getting

    SAMPLE_TIME CPU_ORA_CONSUMED
    ——————– —————-
    24-APR-2012 15:12:00 .823283325
    24-APR-2012 15:13:00 .838111459
    24-APR-2012 15:14:00 .832590308
    24-APR-2012 15:15:00 .854202354

    What I am not understanding is that for the sample time 24-APR-2012 15:12:00 the sum of "cpu + bcpu" from the
    first query is not equal to .823283325 in the second query.

    Please let me know the relation between CPU + BCPU and CPU_ORA_CONSUMED

    Thanks in advance, Caesar

  6. Caesar Dutta says:

    I am running Kyles query. The machine is 2 x Dual Core Intel Itanium, running on RHEL 4 for Itanium.

    The result I am getting is:
    CPU_TOTAL CPU_OS CPU_ORA CPU_ORA_WAIT
    ———- ———- ———- ————
    211.454 0 211.454 0

    Please clear my doubts – why is Total CPU so high?

    • Difficult to say with so few information, seems coming from:
      select ‘CPU_ORA_CONSUMED’ CLASS, round(value/100,3) AAS
      from v$sysmetric
      where metric_name=’CPU Usage Per Sec’
      and group_id=2;

      Have you divided by 100 ? Unless could be a bug…

      Yannick.

  7. Sir, I saw so many posts in the net that to find out the “session uga memory” and “session pga memory” we should not use the tables like dba_hist_sysstat (if I have understood correctly), “For more clarity and close to accurate figure this value should be retrieved from v$sesstat and v$session view periodically. After plotting graph of these observations for fair amount of days, I could analyze the process memory usage more correctly.”
    ############
    But My concern is that – what if we wanted to plot the graphs for last 72 hours trend ? and my DB is restarted becoz of some issues/planned shutdown…then V$session and V$sesstat is get reset… so at that time what to do ?
    => Can I take help from v$active_session_history as below ?
    # ###########
    I can plot the data by using below query – but will it give us the correct statistics ?
    If not correct , then could you please suggest, any other way of ploting the graphs for last hours trends?
    #################
    select ltime,sum(session_pga_memory),sum(session_uga_memory)
    from (
    SELECT
    to_char(s.SAMPLE_TIME,’yyyy-mm-dd-hh24:mi’) ltime
    , (select ss.value/1024/1024 from v$sesstat ss, v$statname sn
    where ss.sid = s.SESSION_ID and
    sn.statistic# = ss.statistic# and
    sn.name = ‘session pga memory’) session_pga_memory
    , (select ss.value/1024/1024 from v$sesstat ss, v$statname sn
    where ss.sid = s.SESSION_ID and
    sn.statistic# = ss.statistic# and
    sn.name = ‘session uga memory’) session_uga_memory
    FROM
    v$active_session_history s
    ORDER BY to_char(s.logon_time,’yyyy-mm-dd-hh24:mi’))
    group by ltime
    order by ltime
    ;

    • Hi Indranil,

      DBA_HIST_SYSSTAT is, as official documentation says, a snapshot of V$SYSSTAT so I do not see why we should not use it…

      If your database has been restarted then for me it’s dead because even V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY will also be reset at that time…

      Thanks, Yannick.

  8. Hi Yannick,
    Thank you so much for your prompt reply.
    I just wanted to plot last 72 hrs(last 3 days) trend for “session pga memory” vs “session uga memory” ….
    I am bit confused …..could you please suggest : which would be the correct one to acomplish this?
    ##############Query 1 #################################
    select ltime,sum(session_pga_memory),sum(session_uga_memory)
    from (
    SELECT
    to_char(s.SAMPLE_TIME,’yyyy-mm-dd-hh24:mi’) ltime
    , (select ss.value/1024/1024 from v$sesstat ss, v$statname sn
    where ss.sid = s.SESSION_ID and
    sn.statistic# = ss.statistic# and
    sn.name = ‘session pga memory’) session_pga_memory
    , (select ss.value/1024/1024 from v$sesstat ss, v$statname sn
    where ss.sid = s.SESSION_ID and
    sn.statistic# = ss.statistic# and
    sn.name = ‘session uga memory’) session_uga_memory
    FROM
    DBA_HIST_ACTIVE_SESS_HISTORY s
    where s.SAMPLE_TIME between (sysdate -3 ) and sysdate
    ORDER BY to_char(s.SAMPLE_TIME,’yyyy-mm-dd-hh24:mi’))
    group by ltime
    order by ltime
    ;
    ########## Query 2 ##############################
    select to_char(sn.end_interval_time,’yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi’) end_time,
    (s1.value/1024/1024) session_pga_memory,
    (s2.value/1024/1024) session_uga_memory
    from
    dba_hist_sysstat s1,
    dba_hist_sysstat s2,
    dba_hist_snapshot sn
    where
    s1.snap_id = sn.snap_id
    and s2.snap_id = sn.snap_id
    and s1.stat_name = ‘session pga memory’
    and s2.stat_name = ‘session uga memory’
    and sn.end_interval_time between (sysdate -3 ) and sysdate
    order by to_char(sn.end_interval_time,’yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi’);
    Thanks in advance..
    ( I am strugling to find out a proper query for this ploting )
    From INDRANIL

    • Hi Indranil,

      In query 1 you are mixing live information (V$SESSTAT) and historical information (DBA_HIST_ACTIVE_SESS_HISTORY) so I do not see how it can work…

      I’m sure you have noticed that DBA_HIST_SESSTAT does not exists (maybe would be too big/too time consuming to store it)

      That’s why I rather prefer your query 2 which is correct in my opinion !

      Thanks, Yannick.

  9. Dilip Patel says:

    Hi Yannick,

    Is v$active_session_history view part of Tuning pack? Could we use this without license of Management packs ?

    Thx

    Dilip Patel

    • Hi Dilip,

      Good point ! Diagnostic pack is required to use this view, apparently (not tested) if you have not licensed it the view should be empty:
      http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/license.112/e47877/options.htm#DBLIC165

      You can control this using (we do license Diagnostic+tuning packs where I work):

      SQL> show parameter control_management_pack_access
       
      NAME                                 TYPE        VALUE
      ------------------------------------ ----------- ------------------------------
      control_management_pack_access       string      DIAGNOSTIC+TUNING

      Thanks, Yannick.

  10. Hi,

    For those like me which don’t have access to the diagnostic pack, there is the following alernative :
    http://www.kylehailey.com/ash-masters/

    I used my own script based on the work from kyle hailey to build the ash graph and many more things. Bascically v$active_session_history is just historical data from v$session, the only thing you have to do is to make a snapshot every second of your v$session view and store it in a table.

    Cyrille

  11. Juan Zarama says:

    Hello

    Does anyone have a excel sheet that help me to do a decent graph (could you share it ?)
    I’m not an excel expert and my graphics are a mess

    Thanks

  12. Luis Santos says:

    Yannick, is it possible to create a more “history” version.

    I mean to replace V$ACTIVE_SESSION_HISTORY with DBA_HIST_ACTIVE_SESS_HISTORY and V$SYSMETRIC_HISTORY with DBA_HIST_SYSMETRIC_HISTORY.

    But seems that DBA_HIST_SYSMETRIC_HISTORY does´t have ‘CPU Usage Per Sec’ metric… 🙁

    • Luis,

      Yes it is possible and I have done it using Highcharts and JQuery !

      What I have used in DBA_HIST_ACTIVE_SESS_HISTORY:

      DECODE(NVL(wait_class,'ON CPU'),'ON CPU',DECODE(session_type,'BACKGROUND','BCPU','CPU'),wait_class) AS wait_class

      Only CPU Wait is not accessible for historical figures… So far ?

      Hope it helps,
      Yannick.

  13. Hi,

    The graph i get on excel doesn’t resemble what i see in OEM. But the post shows the excel graph as a replica of OEM graph. Can you please elaborate the steps of the graph creation.

    Thanks,
    Rajesh.

    • Hi,

      The easiest is to execute the query (change nls_date_format for your session) in SQL Developer. Then extract the query result as Excel (xlsx).

      Open the generated file in Excel and add a new stacked area chart. In the proposed chart you should see the one you target automatically proposed by Excel (I’m using Office 2013).

      The remaining part is cosmetic by changing the colors of the series.

      Hope it helps.

      Thanks,
      Yannick.

  14. Hi Yannick

    I ran your query, below are the values for every 1 minute gap how do i interpret the CPU
    NUM_CPU = 30

    SAMPLE_TIME CPU
    *********************** ******
    19-APR-2017 09:03:00 PM .70
    19-APR-2017 09:04:00 PM 2.48
    19-APR-2017 09:05:00 PM 2.77
    19-APR-2017 09:06:00 PM 3.20
    19-APR-2017 09:07:00 PM 33.68
    19-APR-2017 09:08:00 PM 45.63

    • Hello Vijay,

      Read Kyle Hailey’s post this is very well explained here.
      What you get is an Average Active Sessions, what we can see is that you system is quite overloaded…

      Thanks,
      Yannick.

  15. Can you please provide the link

    but my question was more of CPU interpretation from your query like wise Concurrency

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>